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High Gun 2: Why Tom Cruise Wasn’t Allowed To Fly An F-18 Fighter Jet

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All through Top Gun: Maverick, Tom Cruise’s character Pete “Maverick” Mitchell pilots a number of plane, however the US Navy forbade the actor from piloting the F-18 Tremendous Hornet. Set for launch, after a number of bumps in its schedule, on Could 27, 2022, Joseph Kosinski’s sequel to the unique 1986 hit film High Gun guarantees unmatched and unforgettable aerial fight scenes. The film has additionally prioritized sensible results over CGI, including authenticity to the motion. Whereas Cruise is famend for performing his personal stunts for a lot of of his films, a few of the methods proposed for High Gun: Maverick had been somewhat too bold, even by Cruise’s requirements.

In an interview with Empire, Tom Cruise stated he advised High Gun: Maverick producer Jerry Bruckheimer that he agreed to return as Maverick with one stipulation: “I stated to Jerry [Bruckheimer], ‘I’ll do it if…’ that means, I’m not going to do the CGI stuff.” In different phrases, Cruise signed on for the undertaking solely with Bruckheimer’s settlement that the movie’s results not be reliant on hokey-looking CGI. Cruise was so bold, the truth is, that he had initially hoped to fly an actual Boeing F-18 fighter jet. A licensed pilot, Cruise is well-accustomed to high-octane aviation stunts. Many Cruise followers will already remember that most of the extra spectacular helicopter stunts in 2018’s Mission: Inconceivable – Fallout had been carried out by Cruise. Nevertheless, Bruckheimer maintains that the US Navy finally denied Cruise’s requests to fly the Tremendous Hornet, which boasts a price ticket in extra of $70 million.

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The F-18 jet does characteristic in High Gun: Maverick, however these scenes had been all accomplished with help from Navy pilots. Based on producer Bruckheimer, Cruise does fly a P-51 propeller-driven fighter aircraft, in addition to some helicopters. With the help of expert enhancing, the motion sequences ought to stay convincing to even probably the most well-trained eye. There is no affirmation but about why the US Navy might need denied Cruise’s aspirations to pilot a Tremendous Hornet – however probably the most logical purpose could be insurance coverage issues, which is at all times sufficient of a consideration to stop actors from doing their very own stunts.

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The price of the aircraft additionally figures into this – the price of an actual F-18 Tremendous Hornet would make up roughly half of High Gun: Maverick‘s $152 million price range. That may be more likely to create logistical nightmares for the insurance coverage of the movie. That is not even to say insuring Cruise himself, who, although already a licensed pilot, has little expertise with this type of supersonic army plane. Insurance coverage woes apart, ought to an inexperienced pilot similar to Cruise lose management of a high-speed plane, it might additionally imply peril for civilians and/or army personnel on the bottom.

Followers should wait till spring of 2022 to see Cruise return to the hazard zone as Maverick. Judging from interviews and trailers, it seems as if Bruckheimer and Cruise are honest of their claims that High Gun: Maverick emphasizes sensible results over CGI. Each the actor and the producer appear dedicated to creating probably the most immersive expertise potential. Maybe followers can agree that this film holds loads of thrill potential, no matter whether or not or not its actors are truly piloting multimillion-dollar fighter jets.

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